The Ferrari 250 GTO is a racing GT car which was produced by Ferrari from 1962 to 1964 for homologation into the FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car category. In May 2012 the 1962 250 GTO made for Stirling Moss became the world’s most expensive car in history, selling in a private transaction for $38,115,000 to US communications magnate Craig McCaw.In October 2013, Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo sold chassis number 5111GT to an unnamed buyer for a new record, somewhere within the $38 million range.The numerical part of its name denotes the displacement in cubic centimeters of each cylinder of the engine, whilst GTO stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”, Italian for “Grand Touring Homologated.” When new, the GTO cost $18,000 in the United States, and buyers had to be personally approved by Enzo Ferrariand his dealer for North America, Luigi Chinetti.

In total, 39 250 GTOs were manufactured between 1962 and 1964. This includes 33 cars with 1962-63 bodywork (Series I), three cars with 1964 (Series II) bodywork similar to the Ferrari 250 LM and three “330 GTO” specials with a larger engine. Four of the older 1962-1963 (Series I) cars were retrofitted in 1964 with an updated (Series II) body.

Advertisement

In 2004, Sports Car International placed the 250 GTO eighth on a list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s, and nominated it the top sports car of all time. Similarly, Motor Trend Classicplaced the 250 GTO first on a list of the “Greatest Ferraris of All Time.” Popular Mechanics named it the “Hottest Car of All Time.”

The 250 GTO was designed to compete in GT racing, where its rivals would include the Shelby Cobra, Jaguar E-Type and Aston Martin DP214. The development of the 250 GTO was headed by chief engineer Giotto Bizzarrini. Although Bizzarrini is usually credited as the designer of the 250 GTO, he and most other Ferrari engineers were fired in 1962 due to a dispute with Enzo Ferrari. Further development of the 250 GTO was overseen by new engineer Mauro Forghieri, who worked with Scaglietti to continue development of the body.The design of the car was a collaborative effort and cannot be ascribed to a single person.

The mechanical aspects of 250 GTO were relatively conservative at the time of its introduction, using engine and chassis components that were proven in earlier competition cars. The chassis of the car was based on that of the 250 GT SWB, with minor differences in frame structure and geometry to reduce weight, stiffen and lower the chassis. The car was built around a hand-welded oval tube frame, incorporating A-arm front suspension, rear live-axle with Watt’s linkage, disc brakes, and Borrani wire wheels. The engine was the Tipo 168/62 Comp. 3.0 L V12 as used in the 250 Testa Rossa. This engine was an all-alloy design utilizing a dry sump and six 38DCN Weber carburetors. It produced approximately 300 horsepower and was very reliable, proved by previous competition experience with the Testa Rossa. The gearbox was a new 5-speed unit with Porsche-type synchromesh.

Bizzarrini focused his design effort on the car’s aerodynamics in an attempt to improve top speed and stability. The body design was informed by wind tunnel testing at Pisa Universityas well as road and track testing with several prototype cars. The resulting all-aluminium bodywork had a long, low nose, small radiator inlet, and distinctive air intakes on the nose with removable covers. Early testing resulted in the addition of a rear spoiler. The underside of the car was covered by a belly pan and had an additional spoiler underneath formed by the fuel tank cover. The aerodynamic design of the 250 GTO was a major technical innovation compared to previous Ferrari GT cars, and in line with contemporary developments by manufacturers such as Lotus. The bodies were constructed by Scaglietti, with the exception of early prototypes with bodies constructed in-house by Ferrari or by Pininfarina (in the case of s/n 2643 GT). Cars were produced in many colours, with the most famous being the bright red “Rosso Cina”.

The interior of a 250 GTO is extremely basic, emphasizing the car’s racing intentions. The instrument panel does not contain a speedometer, seats are cloth-upholstered, and no carpeting or headliner is present. Cockpit ventilation is provided by exterior air inlets. The exposed metal gate defining the shift pattern became a Ferrari tradition that was maintained in production models until recently (due to the exclusivity of paddle-shift gearboxes across the range).

I love this model as it is one of my favorite cars hands down the detail is all there in classic Kyosho fashion. Great paint detailed front grill proper decals. In my opinion this is the best 1/64 GTO out there. This is a must have if you like Ferraris and are a Kyosho collector.

Info above from Wiki

Thanks for looking