Tomica time is here again. It’s been awhile since we have seen a Tomica casting of an American car, and not many cars are more American than this. One can think of this as a Smokey Sunday. Today we examine Tomica F42-1, the Pontiac Firebird TransAm. This casting entered the range in February, 1978, and couldn’t be more of a period piece:

Although many Japanese enthusiasts embrace American cars, I have little doubt this casting came into existence to boost sales when Pocket Cars were gaining ground in the US. Scale is a claimed 1:68, likely accurate as usual, as it seems just slightly small. It is a well detailed casting, although proportionally it seems to have a little too much length or too little height, like it is stretched. No matter, there’s still no mistaking what it is. The hood bird tampo is precise, the gold wheels are perfect for the black paint and gold bird, and this casting features the snappy door action, crisp glazing, and springy suspension we know and love about vintage Tomica. From all angles, one can picture this car being westbound and down:

Doors open to reveal an accurately detailed interior and steering wheel:

Front and rear have similar quality detail, the inset grille/light silver contrast is a nice accent:

The base is metal, which gives some heft, and has ample detail:

This example is lucky enough to live in a nice original F-series box:

This is a cool little piece of the era, and I am glad to have it in my collection. This model is very similar to F13-2, a Firebird which appears identical, and I haven’t determined what is different, other than it was released later. I only wish this casting had T-tops, but Tomica seldom added that feature, kind of surprising as the brand had a sunroof fetish for a short time:

Some 1:1 scenes from the 1977 American cinematic classic, Smokey and the Bandit, from IMCDB.org. A movie once reviled, but now seen as fairly special compared to so much modern material. The car in the original Smokey is the same generation as this casting. I can hear many Buford T. Justice one liners in my head. As Frog/Carrie would say, “I got the metal to the pedal and the thing to the floor”: