The latest addition to my collection has always been somewhat of a unicorn to me. I have always wanted one but missed out on a chance to buy one years ago...until now.

Joining the matte black LFA, the white version has captured my heart since day one. Back when my now closed down local diecast shop had a white example for $180, I thought it was too expensive and out of my budget... this remained as one of the biggest mistake I’ve made regarding this hobby... and has ultimately haunted me for years.

Fortunately, I was lucky enough to snatch one up at a lower than expected price!! Now onto the car itself..

The LFA was essentially a car no one expect to exist but somehow did. In fact, Lexus crafted up the plan for such a beast in the early 2000s (codenamed P280). Half a decade later in 2005, the first LFA concept was premiered. However, it wasn’t all the way until 2009 when the production model was officially shown at the Tokyo Motor Show.

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With nearly a decade of planning, results had to be up to par... and damn right they were. Engine for example... was co-developed with Yamaha. Carbon Fiber body and monocoque came from a specially made machine with a sole purpose of producing weaves for the LFA.. Additionally, it’s interesting to know that Lexus lost money on every model sold...

Onto the model, I would definitely place this at the golden age for AutoArt. Diecast body, great attention to details (for the most part) and unbeatable prices (back then). The exterior features radical aerodynamics and beautifully crafted satin chrome rims. In typical AutoArt fashion, every angle was beautifully crafted and overall lines represented the car well.

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Unlike the weight-saving, carbon fibered interior on the LFA Nurburgring, the ‘regular’ (if we can even call it that) version features carpeted flooring, leather seats, infotainment system and all the necessities you would expect on a nearly ~$400k supercar. Typical to AutoArt’s fashion, interior is by far the highlight of this model. Black with contrasting red interior fairs extremely nicely with a white exterior.

To see what I mean, refer to the interior of the matte black one for example. Contrasting interiors simply looks miles better on any supercar.

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The motor is well detailed and as far as I can tell, the only difference between this and AutoArt’s LFA Nurburgring engine, are the two cylinder heads(?) which are featured in silver rather than the gold you see here. The carbon fiber engine strut and depth of the engine adds to the overall realism of the model. Well done once again.

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The rims were initially what attracted me towards the car. Rarely do you see models with black chrome rims. In AutoArt’s shoes, these are extremely well detailed. Everything from the Brembo calipers, carbon ceramics to the bolts on the rims are fantastic. I can’t put them in words, so let the glorious image speak for itself.

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AutoArt’s attention to detail are generally very well done. Front of the model features perforated grills and even a perforated logo! Something I was initially surprised to see on the LFA Nurburging as well (I still own that one). Hood shutlines are well maintained and similarly on the rear, the glass trunk/bay is also well replicated.

One HUGE miss for the car is that the rear grill is one big slab of plastic... this to me, is horrid to see considering the model comes from AutoArt’s Signature range.... But don’t worry, this was addressed on the more recent Nurburgring versions with perforated grills.

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During AutoArt’s golden era, they have typically never been shy to express attention to small but rather necessary details. Perforated grills for one, makes up the majority of them. The perforated hood was definitely a major plus for the model.

At the end of it all, this model is definitely one of my favorites and definitely one I’d keep for years to come. Sure it may not be the best detailed model or even the best looking supercar, but the innovation and cutting edge technology that has gone into the car, makes it one of a kind. AutoArt’s 1st edition replicas has skyrocketed in value since their original debut nearly 5 years ago and rightfully so. It’s striking to look at and definitely an eye candy. Would I recommend this model? Without a doubt yes. Is it worth the now $400+ market price? That would be up to you personally. Fortunately I did not pay that much for either one of my examples.

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Thanks for reading!

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