This Carrera is another from SIKU but more recent than the 911 Turbo I posted yesterday and the Ferrari from a couple of weeks prior. Most would know about the GT I’d assume and as its a modern car there’s plenty of info around for it. Plus, although I appreciate modern Porsche products I stopped paying attention to the new ones after the addition of coolant around 20 years ago. Yes, I’m old fashioned ok!

One slightly interesting fact I found out about SIKU is that its parent company made lots of different die cast products starting in the early 20’s, including the Mercedes-Benz hood ornament for a while, before expanding into toy production in 1950. Strangely though the first toys were made from plastic before starting die cast production in 1963. The name SIKU is an abbreviation of the first two letters of the parent company founders surname (Sieper) and the first two letters of the German word for plastic (Kunststoff)(not a swear word)

The 910 is made by Tintoys of Hong Kong, I can’t find out much about Tintoys other than a page that shows a small range of sports cars made by them and only found that by googling the ‘W.T. 204 PORSCHE found on the base as there is no mention of any maker on there. It seems to be a page for a shop in the Canary Islands called ‘Casa Vasi’ * link below. (traveling the world looking for clues you end up in the strangest places.)

The model in question is not very well proportioned but you can see the resemblance to the full sized 910 Porsche, which was only raced for about a year in the mid 60’s according to WIKI http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porsche_9…

Link to the Canary Island toy shop page for Tintoys cars.

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UPDATE; more info on Tintoys,

“Tintoys & Tins’ Toys by Kimmo Sahakangas

It is unknown how this Hong Kong based company was named. One can imagine they were in the tin plate toys business. In the 1970s and 1980s, they manufactured small-scale diecast vehicles identified by a “WT” prefixed model number on the baseplate. Different Tintoys logos were used, the first appearing very much like a “W” centered on a triangle. The “T” would be two t’s! Perhaps this is the use of “WT” for their numbering system. The second was titled Tins’ Toys, identified by a “T” prefixed numbering system. Some castings were produced with more than one number. The majority of both “WT” and “T” models were provided with a plastic baseplate. During the 1970s, Tintoys issued their “Die Cast Sport Car Fast Wheels” series of race cars From this manufacturer’s own words on the blister card: “Die-cast Sport Car with fast-speed wheels, doll driver, chrome plated hub-caps and exhaust pipes, finished in bright colored metallic paints with adhesive markings”. Some of these were also available in window boxes titled “Fast-Speed Wheels Die-Cast Mini Sedan”. “Models of Classic Car” comprised of antique automobiles that are slightly larger scale than most Tintoys issued.

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Military “Die-Cast Armored Car” vehicles appear to be geared toward enthusiasts demanding realism. These models are smaller in scale that other Tintoys with tan wheels. “Mini Coach”, and “Bus” are two other series that were available. Several models were provided with a pencil sharpener within the casting. Tintoys even produced simple, larger scale vehicles converted to ornaments for Christmas trees. Not all “WT” models were available only under Tintoys.

Over twenty years ago, E.F.S., and Imperial Toy Company distributed these models through mass marketing in the United States. K-Mart offered this series at their department stores. “T” models were available from Kingsbury, a distributor, during this same time period.

Several “WT” models have continued production by High Speed, another Hong Kong diecast firm. These models are casted with another numbering system that is arbitrary to collectors.

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Tintoys is currently in business. Large-scale models are available with faithful reproductions of actual vehicles. Several were displayed at the Western States Toy & Hobby Show in Pomona California. It is not known which firms are marketing these current offerings. Other large-scale models are available too, often with poor detailing and can be found in open displays mixed with models from other manufacturers.”

The badge on the GT is comically large but otherwise the model is fairly well detailed.

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I’ve no idea what the scale of the Tintoys car is but its not too the same scale as the SIKU(1/55)

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The clear engine cover looks better in real life and shows some (blurry) motor details.

After the badge complaint there are two other things that bother me with the SIKU. First one is the doors don’t appear to have any kind of spring to keep them shut. This would be a problem during high speed cornering. The second complaint is that the wheels are both fixed to the axle so with the rubber tyres it makes cornering difficult even on slick surfaces, this may be why they omitted door springs as you can’t corner at speed anyway.

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And here is the reason I have both these vehicles together. Being that both of these cars come from the same manufacturer you expect some design language too creep in, and the fact that both of these vehicles are mid mount engine designs the final shape would naturally be similar right?

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Check out the silhouettes! From the front bumper to the rear of the doors the shape is very similar. The rear is not so much although both have a small up turn spoiler, in the side profile at least with the GT actually becoming a wing between the guards when viewed from the rear.

Front and rear views show both vehicles to have similar features as well. Eg: each has two headlights, a bonnet between the front guards, front guards. Two exhaust pipes, Taillights, etc

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The Tintoys looks as if it would handle like it was on rails, if it was on rails. Seriously check out those train wheels! Damn!