Not many four-door vehicles can elicit the type and level of enthusiasm that the BMW M5 does. Each successive generation surpasses not only the preceding, but also the multitudes of competitors that have only now just caught up to the whirlwind of capabilities of the outgoing model. We each have our favorite iteration, and chances are this is it. The 1998-2003 “E39" generation M5. In 1/18. By Ottomobile.

The BMW M5 is right at this moment, and has been since the beginnings of the very first M535i, been the daddy. Always enough power on tap to deliver a wallop through the special gearbox, delivered through to the specially tuned suspension and enhanced wheels and tires, the M5 of any generation is simply a monster in it’s own right. The fun trick here actually comes when you stick fully grown adults in the back, luggage in the trunk, and drive around showing high-end exotica whats what.

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Now, as the ever-correct Pillarless Coupe has shown us with great result, Ottomobile gives us completely sealed versions of some of our must-haves. So no fancy GIFs this time. Often enough, they offer items that not many other manufacturers feature in their line-ups. Such is the case with this 2001 version of the Ultimate Driving Machine, only available from Otto in this scale.

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The 2001-2003 edition of this car features minor upgrades which, in the 1:1 market, can mean a staggering price difference if so-equipped. The Corona Ring headlights (Halos or Angel Eyes, to most) provided a more characteristic and menacing look as well as a safer driving experience, the interior received a larger screen for the NAV/ICE system, different upper areas in the rear lights, a three-spoked //M steering wheel, and a host of smaller and less noticeable upgrades throughout. This diecast model, while missing the obviously unnecessary mechanical changes of the ‘face lifted’ model, does display exceptionally correct details on the lovely exterior, at least as much as thought to be economically viable on the decent interior.

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A decent enough interior, not spectacular but featuring a few cool details. Naturally we’re going to go nuts with the CSI:LaLD Super Zoom!

//M Logo and shift pattern on the gear knob, map of... somewhere on the GPS screen, and pretty nicely scaled moldings of all the hundred of buttons available in this, the top of the line of the already tencho-laden 5-Series.

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With the Super Zoom stuck in the ON position, the three-spoked steering wheel and the nicely detailed gauges become all the more visible. I really do need a better DSLR lens for these shots.

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In this last shot, and the next, one of the larger flaws of this piece comes to light. The separation and paint lines throughout the interior are not very good, they waver from being true, straight lines and very much alter the feel of the model when handled up-close. One can only get this gaze through very nicely made “glass” components, offering a glaze very similar to a 1:1 car.

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The seats suffer from this flaw equally badly, and if a glimpse can be had through the windows, the interiors lack of higher levels of quality becomes apparent.

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From underneath this car doesn’t have much to offer. It is odd seeing a completely sealed underside ending in nice, chrome exhaust tips. They’re angled like the real thing, protrude about as far as the real ones should, and aside from the chrome tips being joined in the middle unlike the real thing, they are a nice touch to a wonderful exterior.

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The rear of the car features the signature //M lip spoiler and the nicely recreated ‘Celis’ design rear lights. The “5" part of the //M5 logo on this particular one is letting go a little bit, and that makes me a sad panda...

The heated rear window and very accurate looking 3rd brake light are nice touches.

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Those exhausts, and nicely dished rear wheels with pretty accurate tires really convince me there is a 400HP 4.9l V8 hiding at the other end.

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No engine, lets check out the tires some more. They would ideally have lettering and some more convincing sidewalls, but in that same way the wheels aren’t quite the right color of Chrome Shadow. I appreciate the little //M and BMW logos on the wheels, they look very cool.

The front wheels are just as nicely cast as the rears. Even though this //M logo is a little off, the side strip has an even smaller logo on it!

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The front lights are nicely recreated. Despite the E39 lights being simple designs when compared even to other period headlights, these are nicely curved inside, and the ‘Corono Rings’ are very much there. Fog lights look equally convincing, with the headlight washer cap and tow hook cover really sealing the deal up-front.

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All-in-all, this is a decent model, especially considering what they were available for when new. These days they command a much larger premium. The exterior molding is very much up to par with the big boys in the diecast manufacturing world, with the vast majority of plastic detail pieces being up-to-par as well. The interior and sealed-cast design is the obvious trade off here, and it means this car is destined to be relegated to the 2nd and 3rd tier display spots in some collections. It is a must-have for any fan of the M5 however, and if you can live with the concessions of it being an Ottomobile, rock on. I personally recommend trying to get one closer to the original price like I did.

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That’s it for today then, until next time!

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