Today, amidst the flaregasm of spectacular 1/18 machines and others you guys have shared, I humbly present this 1/43 Ligier JS2-Maserati. If I’d known today was going to be 1/18s and flares I’d have done the R5 this week! This little Ligier is a car I’ve been after for awhile, and I owe this one to Jobjoris as he was kind enough to source it for me in Europe, among many other cars I received from him last week (more to come!).

Small Scale Sydney did a fine job covering the JS2 road car’s gestation back in March, so I’ll recommend you read that for the backstory as I focus on the racing version shown here. Everything about the JS2 is cool to me, from Guy Ligier’s all-around badassery, to his use of Jo Schlesser’s initials for this and all his cars, to the Maserati Merak & Citroen SM-sourced V6/5-speed powertrain, and the absurd wing on the back of the racing versions.

Dat flare though... like a well-built woman

For racing duty, the 2.7L road car V6 was taken to 3.0L displacement and initially rated at 270hp. After a mostly disappointing first season in 1972, the engine was reworked and given a dry-sump system, with its power rating increasing substantially to 330hp. For 1974 it would receive the large wing and further aero developments on display here, which helped it achieve its first major success, a 1-2 at the 1974 Tour de France Auto.

Advertisement

This is the winning car, shared by the French team of drivers Gerard Larousse and Jean-Pierre Nicolas with co-driver Johnny Rives. Unfortunately this would be the highest achievement of the V6 powered JS2, as it was classified in the S3.0 class by the FIA, which pitted it against top prototypes such as the Porsche 908, Alfa Tipo33, and almightly Matra MS670. Doesn’t seem fair, does it? The FIA rarely is, though considering the move to 3.0L prototype rules was designed specifically to steal victory from Porsche and hand it to Matra (which it did), it did no favors to Ligier’s homegrown effort. I suppose state sponsorship has its benefits.

Following the realization that the V6 simply was not adequate given the car’s classification, a drastic change was made for the 1975 season, with the addition of two more cylinders from another manufacturer. But that’s a story for another time, hopefully soon (he said, with a wink).

Advertisement

This model is in metal by Altaya and shows remarkable detail for the money, their calling card. I couldn’t be happier to finally add this to my collection. Once again the network of great people we have here shines. Thanks Jobjoris!

Advertisement

Advertisement

There’s one notable error with this model, not that it’s ever on display. See if you can spot it below, there are breadcrumbs written above...

Advertisement

Thanks for a great day of flares and racing greats today, as well as for the mind-blowing Shark Week. Have a great weekend!