Pininfarina and Peugeot go way back. That gorgeous 405 Coupé we all love. The 504 Coupe with it’s PRV V6. And the entire 404 line-up I’ve told about before.

From that series also a Coupé and Cabriolet were made. And these were not just designed at Pininfarina’s: manufacturing these was outsourced to Peugeot’s Italo-partner as well.

The car on display here is a Coupé. Of course it didn’t come with the cheapest drivetrain available: Peugeot/Pininfarina mounted their XCKF2 engine, a 1618 cc 4-cylinder engine with a German mechanical injection made by Kügelfischer. I assume the KF in XCKF2 is derived from that.

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Still no powerhorse with it’s 96 hp. Let’s just say it was “capable for it’s time”, we’re talking 1962 here. It was introduced half a year after Pininfarina showed the cabriolet of this one at the 1961 Mondial de l’Automobile in Paris, somehow that seems a bit odd to me. I’d expect the Convertible to be based on the Coupe.

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And it was clearly a time in which countries still had all kinds of import taxes not all that “friendly”. In England the Coupé had the same price as a... Jaguar MK2 with it’s way bigger inline 6. And in l‘Etats-Unis the convertible had roughly the same price as a Jaguar E-type, $3,995. Or 50 percent more than the $2,645 Super Luxe four-door Chrysler 300.

Well, taxes wasn’t the only thing that made it costly, Peugeot’s logistic had a hand in that as well: Peugeot shipped assembled floorpans by rail to Pininfarina’s factory in Grugliasco, a western suburb of Torino, where the body panels were pressed and installed. Pininfarina painted the body shells and installed the interiors before sending the cars back to Peugeot’s Sochaux factory, where their powertrains were mounted. And then they had to be shipped over the Atlantic.

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In the end Peugeot and Pininfarinas built 17225 of these. The chassis numbers only go to 17223, it is believed the last two bodies were used for the diesel record cars and didn’t get a chassisnumber. For those unfamiliar with the diesel record cars: They look a bit odd.

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Would love a 1/43 of that one though...

The last ones were produced in 1969. After that Peugeot’s niche coupé was replaced by the 504 Coupé. But that one I’ve shown before. And appeals to me more than the 404 actually.

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This model is another Minichamps, 1/43 of course. It’s a model that suffers from the somewhat harder fixation of photo-edged materials as the Peugeot script on the back clearly is separating from the cast. And that’s a bit weird because this usually only is an issue with resin casts.

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Those window wipers do look a bit too fat, the Pininfarina badges behind the doors are a bit off (you’ll really have to zoom in to see that actually) but those are truly the only cons I can come up with.

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According to it’s license plate the car was registered in the Paris département and that’s where this one fits the best probably. Maybe I need to recreate some sort of Parisienne street for future French Friday posts but that would be quite some work so maybe better don’t count on that.

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C’est ca! “Just” four French Friday posts last week, let’s see if we can add some to that today. Bon Week-End!