Big things with little cars
Big things with little cars
Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

I’ve posted about this car’s fancy little sibling a few weeks ago. And yet: I’m not sure you know this one. Pourquoi? It’s just a Cinque, non? Well, not exactly. !

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

Sure it’s family, the nose makes that clear instantly. Yet, it’s not a Cinque. Actually, it’s not even French. Completely. It’s roots are, of course, but this one was made in Spain. Any guesses yet?

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

It’s a Renault Siete. And if you know your Spanish you would have known that means “Seven”. It was built bij FASA, Fabricacion de Automoviles Sociedad Anonima, a company based in Valladolid, Spain. At first a private company license-building Renault’s 4CV, later on partly owned by Renault (renamed to FASA-Renault) and building every Renault car except for the big ones. From 2000 and onwards it’s a 100% subsidiary of Renault.

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

And this Siete was actually the only car developed by FASA themselves. The wheelbase was lengthened a bit (just 6 cm), still different between left and right as with the normal R5. This was caused by the use of full-width torsion bars placed one behind the other, ahead of those rear wheels. The body differs of course with that boot and extra doors (when the Siete was introduced the R5 only was available with 3 doors).

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

And chromed bumpers still are more awesome then those plastic ones mounted on the R5. That rear always appeared a bit Japanese to me. Somewhat like an Isuzu Bellett, and there’s some resemblance with a vintage Mazda as well. I think. Just don’t know which one. Thank you Small Scale Sydney for pointing me out this was probably a Mazda Familia/1300, that’s the one I meant.

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

It was only available with the small 1000 cc (later 1100) engine, producing only 50hp and it was built from 1974 to 1982. It was mainly sold in Spain as the other Renault sedans actually were not that much more expensive. In those 8 years over 160.000 units were produced. The introduction of the Renault 9 in Spain ended it all.

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

The model is an IXO in 1/43 scale. I like this color a lot although it’s hard to make it stand out when photographed. Maybe on a black backdrop?

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Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux

Wrong focus... But if you ever been to Spain these kind of pastel-tints were quite common. Just check the front of the 1975 brochure:

Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux
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To complete my R5-collection I actually want one other 1/43 and that’s the Leotard 6-wheeler. So don’t think I’m ready displaying R5-variantes.

Illustration for article titled French Friday: Numéro sept chanceux
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Not sure if those yellow lenses were a Spanish thing come to think of it. C’est ca. J’espère que vous avez apprécié cette histoire. Bon Week-end!

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