I am a GT40 snob, going back to the days of HotWheels releasing the MkI in their First Editions in 1999. I would buy all iterations, and then detail them from lights to grills, just because I felt they were lacking detail.

I now mainly collect 1:18 cars, and once again, their detail and price must be justifiable. So did SC do just that? Let’s take a look at the pros and cons

I actually own 4 SC GT40s. Three MkII, and a MkIV, but today we’ll use this one as an example. This model had been at my local Toys R Us for almost three years. No one wanted it because it was damaged, and I couldn’t justify buying it until I decided to make a custom MkIIB, and was discounted from the business closing. This line is (was?) pretty accessible, with a couple retail stores such as Toys R Us carrying them, and usually run you under $50.00, a fair price considering similar MkII’s made by Exoto can be around 6 times the price and up. The proportions seem to be in line, and was suprised at some added exterior details like red jack hooks in the front, the painted carb in a clear bowl and the clear central duct.

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Even more so the body opens up both in the front and rear, as well as the front bonnet where a spare sits inside. That’s a nice touch considering the Revell GT40's had exqisite detail in the engine bay, but the front half is sealed, and can cost a few hundred with the box and certificate.

The engine bay gets a C- for detail. With exception of the carb, and correct valve covers with “Powered by Ford” raised on them, there was a lot left to be desired. No plumbing or wires, there’s large gaps where suspension should be, and the pair of trunks are chromed out, and too small, but the biggest offender is the engine, it is literally backwards, as in the belt driven accessories are facing the transmission.

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The interior detail gets a C+, and may of been worse, had they not corrected their earlier run of having the steering wheel on the left side (No F.A.V or KarKraft GT40 ever had the steering on the left.) The seats are soft, and the dash layout is close enough, but the interior may of come from another car since they put the shifter on the center tunnel, instead of in the Right side door sill, nor did GT40's have a parking brake handle.

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The exterior is what really grinds my gears, and I give it a C+. Some great details were implimented like see through mesh glass in the rear, and the riveting, as well as body fitment, but my compliments stop there. Some cars were right, and some were way off, and it showed Shelby wanted to produce a really great model, but must of seen the production price and looked to cut corners.

This car should of had two things, one of them they never bothered to put on half the models that in real life had it: The Gurney Bubble, and the other is correct graphics on some.

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This car is actually using the ‘66 Sebring #2 numbering, I know this because I also own that car. As seen on this box photo, it should of had a Gurney Bubble, removable hood pins, Kiwi decals (Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon were both from New Zealand) and correct period numbering.

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Had they produced the advertised model, it would of been an Exoto rival hands down, and I would of gladly laid down $30.00 more for it, but with all the corner cutting, this model should of been $30-$35 at most.

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Overall, if you’re looking for a MkII to hang on your shelf and not think of it too much, this will be perfect, otherwise wait on eBay for a good Exoto deal, but be prepared to pay a few hundred. This is a good beginners car to collect, but don’t expect them to climb in price anytime soon.