I was really excited to have found some of the M2 JDM and I’ve opened a couple of the models for a thorough inspections for any quality control issues. Here is a review on my 85th post.

First let’s look at the different angles of what M2 indicated as the 1969 Nissan Bluebird 1600 SSS (Stock version).

Note that although the company is called Nissan I believe that at that time they still used the name Datsun for their brand name even in Japan.

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My first impression is this is a nice 510 that has more detail compared to the Hot Wheels version (I know, Hot Wheels have the 2 doors version but it’s the 510 we’re talking about).

So how did M2 do on the QC issues? I’ve noticed after taking the pictures that there’s a slight bent on the separator of the rear quarter glass on the right. The side mirror on the front left seems to have not been cleanly cut on the rear from most likely a sprue. Some of the white wall is not exactly centered on the wheel. Inconsistent on the wheels as some have holes all around the side and some does not.

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On the plus side, there are no paint issues and wheels do roll and are not wobbly.

Now the second part of our review begins with a comparison between M2 (4 door) and Tomica LV (2 door).

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So looking at a 45 degree angle both seems almost even in their appearance.

At the front, it seems like the chrome circling the grill and headlights on M2 is not as refined as Tomica. It was hard to tell using the naked eye as the chrome part seems to be smooth so it could just be due to bad reflections. It could also be that the black paint on the grill is not as straight as the Tomica which could result in slight jaggedness. The headlights are the most obvious difference as Tomica uses separate parts while M2 most likely molded the grill and headlights together and painted it black all around except for the headlights part.

At the rear the Tomica shows chrome around the rear lights while M2 does not or at least not obvious. The over-riders on the bumper looks thicker on the M2 compare to Tomica.

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Face to face it looks like the M2 sits a bit higher between the body and the tires than Tomica.

Here is where M2 has the upper hand. It allows you to open the hood and show the engine plus 2 side mirrors. Also the hood opens smoothly and is not loose so it holds the hood up.

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Now it’s discectomy time.

It seems that besides the usual individual parts that can be separated, M2 decides to eliminate opening front doors. Of course this has been done with the VW beetle but it was replaced with opening trunk which this one does not. What was the reason? Could be cost cutting or could be complains from collectors that grips about door gaps.

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One thing about M2 is it makes it easy for customizers to removed the parts if they want to do individual painting. However for this after I remove the screw that holds the dash board, it for some unknown reason will not separate and this prevents me from removing the hood. It seems like it is glued with the windshield. So this was a bummer.

Lastly I decided to compare this with an actual Tomica 4 door sedan and it may not be obvious but the M2 is slightly longer.

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Here’s one last look between Tomica and M2.

Oh just in case you are not aware, Tomica LV is releasing a similar 4 door Bluebird SSS in red and silver around September so it will be interesting to compare these 2 in the future. Of course you do have to order them in Japan unless you have a hobby shop that imports these.

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So what do you think? Is M2 a good option for your JDM collection?

Hope you all get something out of this review.