Before the day is over here in the west coast, let’s look at another Walmart exclusive M2 release JDM with their Auto Japan series. How good are they? Let’s check my 89th post with the 1969 Nissan Bluebird 1600 SSS (Racing version).

Previously I showed you the stock version of the 510.

M2 was either smart or cautious by releasing only 3 different models of their first Auto Japan series in both stock and racing livery. I for one love both of them but as of now still missing the Skyline racing livery.

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M2 came up with a nice looking racing livery and since Tomica is planning to release one with the same theme soon, it would be interesting to compare it with M2 when available. It may not be too obvious on the side profile of the car but my only QC issue will be some splatter of silver paint on the left side on both front and back door of the car as shown above. Taking a closer look it could also be perceived as fresh scratch on the paint it received during the race or maybe I could sell it as an error :D (not).

As you may recall or maybe some of you are unaware, Hot Wheels also did a 510 with a somewhat similar theme.

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From Hot Wheels Car Culture

Both seems to pay homage to an actual Bluebird that entered the East African Safari Rally.

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What do I think of the M2 version compare to Hot Wheels? It does have more detail as it uses more individual parts like separate bumpers, grill and tail lights while those are all molded together with the body and chassis on the Hot Wheels. Also Hot Wheels uses LHD in their interior while M2 uses RHD which is what Japan uses.

The usual features are rubber tires, realistic wheels, metal chassis, side mirrors and opening hood but it eliminated opening front doors. What was the reason? Could be cost cutting or could be complains from collectors that grips about door gaps.

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Notice the wheels on both? They are identical with the stock having chrome while the other is black. I believe it is supposed to represent black steel wheels on the racing livery but it is obvious that it is a hub cap which most street cars used at that time but not on a race track. This is where Hot Wheels kind of got it right.

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I’m off to the race track. Till next time. Sayonara.