Confession: I think the Enzo is a pretty ugly looking supercar. 15-year-old me was too blinded by the performance figures and crazy doors to care, but now I’m struggling to appreciate Pininfarina’s design.

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The doors don’t stay up on their own, so I had to wedge a wooden stick inside the hinges for this photo.

Just like the 599 GTB Fiorano, the Enzo has a custom suitcase that fits inside the frunk.

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The interior looks great, especially with all the leather-texture plastics. Unfortunately, the crazy doors make it near impossible to get an iPotato inside for a decent photo.

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This is the only model I’ve ever owned that came with a built-in support rod to hold open the engine cover. it just rotates down flat behind the suspension when you close the engine cover.

I think Hot Wheels really outdid themselves on this engine bay. The depth and colors are fantastic, and there’s an overwhelming collection of wires, suspension coils, carbon fiber appearance plastics, etc.

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Here’s a problem I’ve found with Hot Wheels Elite models: the glue securing the clear plastic degrades over time. I’ve had the same failure on both the Enzo and 575M Superamerica. The Superamerica became unglued after about 5-6 years of living on my display shelf, and the Enzo only became unglued after 10 years of ownership.

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You can see the dried yellow glue along the top/bottom of the window opening. I’m sure there’s some simple glue that will fix it easily, but I’ve never bothered since they sit inside a glass display case anyway and no one (except for all of you guys) will know.