Big things with little cars
Big things with little cars

Hot Wheels: Redlines-1969

It became clear from the start that Hot Wheels cars earned their name, moving off the pegs as quickly as they rolled down sidewalks. To meet the demand, Mattel increased the number of castings to 40, adding 24 new castings.

*Note: I don’t own all the 1969 castings.

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All of them together.

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Classic 32 Ford Vicky. When adding hot rods to any series of vehicles, the 32 Ford is a staple. However, Hot Wheels decided not to use the ever popular coupe or convertible, instead choosing the lesser known Vicky.

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Classic 57 T-Bird. Sorry, you can’t have em. The one on the right is all packaged up to ship to Enginerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. I’m keeping the other. They are the same color, but the lighting is off.

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Custom Continental Mark III. Not really custom. At all.

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Custom Police Cruiser. Again not custom. Actually based on 1968 Plymouth Fury sedan and is so similar, I’m suprised Hot Wheels didn’t get copyright sued. But then again, it was different back then...

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Indy Eagle. I normally don’t like open wheel racecars from the late 60’s, but I like this one. I think it’s the exhaust.

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McLaren M6A. Why does it have a Lola sticker on the back? I don’t like it but don’t have the heart to remove it. Other than that, it’s a beautiful car.

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Mercedes-Benz 280SL. I need one of these in 1/18. Can you believe that people thought these were ugly and boring when they were new? I guess the world wasn’t ready. At least Hot Wheels made it...

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Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. This casting is relatively cheap in its normal color: Enamel gray. I’m just glad I have the two proper colors, red and gray. Why would you want to spends hundreds or thousands for green, purple, or pink?

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Splittin’ Image. My first near mint Redline. I had grand ideas of it being worth hundreds, even thousands. Nope. About $45. It’s kinda ugly too.

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Torero. Nice casting and it is very evident why light blue is a more valuable color for it: it’s just plain pretty. Too bad I don’t have light blue. All I got it light green and brown.

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Turbofire. I open the engine. Something’s not right. THERE’S NO TURBOS. Why call it TURBOfire if it has no turbos?

COMING SOON: Hot Wheels: Redlines-1970

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