Born in Auckland, New Zealand, Bruce McLaren’s earliest competitive driving experience came at the wheel of a modified 1929 Austin Ulster. Bought in bits by his father who had planned to restore the car and sell it, 13-year-old Bruce convinced him they could turn it into a race car.

Involved in every stage of the Ulster’s restoration, the experience proved vital for the future race car designer. Two years later, in his race-prepared Ulster, 15-year-old Bruce set the fastest time in the 750cc class at the Muriwai Beach hill climb.

Seven years later, aged just 22, Bruce won his first Grand Prix. At the time he was the youngest-ever Grand Prix winner – a record that stood for over 40 years. The following year, he won the Argentinian Grand Prix and finished second in the Drivers’ Championship behind Jack Brabham.

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For the next decade, Bruce McLaren remained one of the best drivers in the world. His popularity and enthusiasm for racing never diminished. What did change, however, was his ever-increasing influence over the world of motor racing.

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Bruce McLaren’s vision extended far beyond the driver’s seat. Engineer, designer, inventor, tester, Bruce was an automotive genius. He is one of only two men ever to win a Grand Prix in a racing car bearing his name. The motor racing company he started went on to become the most successful marque in Formula 1 history.

The success of McLaren’s race cars went beyond Formula 1™. There were victories in the Indianapolis 500 in 1972, 74 and 76. McLarens driven by Bruce and Denny Hulme also dominated the Can-Am series, winning five consecutive Constructors’ Championships between 1967 and 71.

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During a test run at Goodwood on 2nd June 1970, the tail section on Bruce’s M8D lifted at 170mph. Spinning off the track, the car hit a protective embankment. Bruce was thrown from the wreckage and tragically lost his life. He was 32.

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The team were told not to come to work the next day. Racers to their core, every one of the team turned up for work, and just 12 days later two McLaren M8Ds were on the grid for the start of the Can-Am series.

Dan Gurney was drafted in to replace Bruce. Despite having never driven the car before, Dan won the race. Denny Hulme, with bandaged hands after a fire in Indianapolis, finished third. In a glorious tribute to Bruce’s racing philosophy, the McLaren team won nine out of ten races that year.

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The McLaren F1 is a supercar designed and manufactured by McLaren Cars. Originally a concept conceived by Gordon Murray, he convinced Ron Dennisto back the project and engaged Peter Stevens to design the exterior and interior of the car. On 31 March 1998, it set the record for the world’s fastest production car, reaching 231 mph (372 km/h) with the rev limiter enabled, and 242.8 mph (390.7 km/h) with the rev limiter removed. The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 beat it in 2005 with a top speed of 253.81 mph (408.47 km/h) according to Top Gear.

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The car features numerous proprietary designs and technologies; it is lighter and has a more streamlined structure than many modern sports cars, despite having one seat more than most similar sports cars, with the driver’s seat located in the centre (and slightly forward) of two passengers’ seating positions, providing driver visibility superior to that of a conventional seating layout. It features a powerful engine and is somewhat track oriented, but not to the degree that it compromises everyday usability and comfort. It was conceived as an exercise in creating what its designers hoped would be considered the ultimate road car. Despite not having been designed as a track machine, a modified race car edition of the vehicle won several races, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1995, where it faced purpose-built prototype race cars. Production began in 1992 and ended in 1998. In all, 106 cars were manufactured, with some variations in the design.

In 1994, the British car magazine Autocar stated in a road test regarding the F1, “The McLaren F1 is the finest driving machine yet built for the public road.” and that “The F1 will be remembered as one of the great events in the history of the car, and it may possibly be the fastest production road car the world will ever see.” In 2005, Channel4 placed the car at number one on their list of the 100 greatest cars, calling it “the greatest automotive achievement of all time”.

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Today we have a dream car of mine the mcLaren F1. I mean even if Kyosho had botched the design up I would be in awe. Kyosho really did a fantastic representing the Na beast. Paint logos wheels general proportions are all there. I love it and am happy to have the relatively rare silver car in my collection.

Info from wiki and cars.com

Thanks for looking

P.S. Who needs a hammer when you have a rocket