Four-door Japanese saloon. Them’s hardly fightin’ words - our minds conjure images of beige Camrys, Accords and Altimas. Hey, I drive a Japanese saloon too and it definitely isn’t something that comes to mind when someone mentions sporty or in this case, race car.

Sure, there are some oddballs in between - think Imprezas, EVOs and of course, the saloon R34 range which, in 1998, debuted with the more environmentally friendly and fuel efficient RB25DET NEO engine. They were primarily marketed in Japan as family cars and not many other countries received them brand new from Nissan.

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Which brings us neatly to what I’m showing you today. Like most things, the Japanese have a way of cranking up the crazy dial to 11 and family cars are no exception. This is the Blitz D1 ER34, a fire-breathing fighter in the 2006 D1 season and champion of the World All Star series of the same year.

This grail of my collection is a 1:24 model of Ken ‘Nomuken/Monkey Magic’ Nomura’s Skyline made by Hotworks Racing Factory.

The Devil’s in the Details

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The 1:1 features a Blitz-reworked RB25DET and it is beautifully replicated here. Producing a whopping 533 bhp at a screaming 7,600 rpm - thanks in part to the huge Blitz K27 turbo producing a max boost pressure of 1.6kg/cm2, - it certainly was enough to kick up a storm of smoke clouds, a trademark of Nomuken.

Given that this model is roughly 11 years old and spent its life as a display model (I got this second-hand earlier this year), the hinges are now too weak to prop the bonnet up for extended periods of time. That’s fine as everything else is impeccable!

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The Dunlop Direzza Z1s are well represented with accurate thread design, but I can’t help but think the (at least what I assume are mould lines) are just a little too visible and detract from the overall look of the car.

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However, props to Hotworks for making durable models. The tyres are still round, with no ‘flat spots’ resulting from it melting or being stuck to a surface for too long. Equal kudos go to the previous owner too for taking care of it so well!

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Wrapped around the rubber are 18" Blitz Techno Speed Wheels Z4, with chrome finishes that totally sets the car off, visually. The brake disc, however simple, is true to form and the Nissan badge detail on the caliper is an appreciated detail.

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Since the doors don’t open, this is the best shot I could get of the interior without dismantling the model. Like the cars in my previous Hotworks reviews, interior detail is something not overlooked. The speedometers are all labelled, and stickers mimicking the various dials and gizmos are nicely cut and perfectly placed.

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If my GTR’s were anything to go by, I’m sure the interior of this feels just as supple. I just love that vibrant blue in the interior!

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Here’s a better shot of the rollcage. Note the seats have the Bride label.

On The Outside

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Before it started tearing the tracks, the design of the graphics might’ve made a few people nearly tear their eyeballs out. The mix of chrome red, gold and blue on a gloss white body is polarising and shouty, a flair that I think every drift car has to have.

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It’s love it or hate it, this. I love it.

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The way the colours pop in lighting is remarkable. Major points to Hotworks for this graphical masterpiece - no lack of lustre, precise details and pinpoint accurate application. They just don’t make ‘em like they used to!

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Adjustable camber and steerable wheels add more value to a model already worth every penny. This ER34 is wild and worth it in every way - if you see one pop up nearby, grab it!

It’s been a pleasure writing about my first (of two) diecast acquisitions this year and ‘till the next time, enjoy the photodump and Viva La LaLD!

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BONUS: Check out what happens when Ken’s mechanic takes a similar car on the streets of Japan for a spin!