Today we’re looking at the fairly typical Jada model which tend to lean towards customized versions of the vehicles being represented. This one is a 1:18 LoPro series release of a Charger SRT-8. It has good detail for the price point, with a few minor paint flaws, good panel fitment and full opening features with all 4 doors, hood and trunklid opening.

Side View

This model presents as a dub version with oversize wheels (at a guess based on scale they may be intended to be 24”) and with extended rocker sills and rear diffuser. Disc brakes are visible with correct red calipers, but the Brembo branding is not used. “HEMI” badges are styled and positioned correctly on the front fenders.

The stripe tampos do not correctly align with the “hip” feature at the trailing end of the rear doors, although they do attempt to mirror that feature.

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Rear Three-quarter View

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Missing is the keyhole for the trunklid. The trunklid badging follows 2009-2010 standards but the taillights are 2006-2008 model year. One of the paint flaws is visible to the right of the Dodge license plate.

An incongruous detail is the appearance of two mutually exclusive Dodge logos on the rear. The model-year-correct Ram’s-head badge is in place on the trunklid. This badge was the Dodge division logo in 2010, but it was later appropriated by the Ram truck division and the Dodge division badge changed to the one shown on the license plate.

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Front View

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At the front we find that the grill is incorrect. The grill surrounds and crossbar on SRT-8 models were always painted body-colour. The correct SRT badge is in place on the lower-right corner (barely visible in a bit of glare.

Also from the front is the most glaring flaw, an incorrect hood. SRT-8 models have functional hoods scoops, missing here.

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Inside

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Looking inside we see good details with a 2006-2008 dashboard and cruise control stalk. An aftermarket video screen is visible in the center. Steering wheel, gauges and center console (not visible here) are correct.

Engine Compartment

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The engine compartment is faithfully reproduced here, although in only a few plastic pieces. The “HEMI 6.1L” valve covers are correct, although the engine shroud between them is from a 5.7L Hemi. The 6.1L did not use a shroud, instead proudly displaying the prominent cast aluminum intake runners. The correct airbox is visible in the front driver’s-side with the coolant tank behind it and on the passenger’s-side front is visible the windshield-washer fill hose and the fuse box behind it.

All in all at the price point (approx. Cdn$ 30 from Amazon.ca) this is a very nice representation of my favourite car. ;-)

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The 1:1

History

The first Charger was a 1964 show car, based on the Dodge Polara and fitted with a 426 Wedge V8 engine. The first production Charger, based on the Dodge Coronet, was introduced as a 1966 model. There were several different vehicles bearing the Charger nameplate built on three different platforms and sizes, all bearing the Charger nameplate. Although the name is associated with the late-1960s performance model in the Dodge range, it was also used on personal luxury coupes during the late-1970s and on front-wheel drive subcompact hatchbacks during the 1980s.

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In 1999, Dodge introduced a new Charger R/T concept car. It took many styling cues from the 1960s Chargers, sharing their long nose and rearward cab, but was shorter at 187 in (4,750 mm), compared to 203 in (5,156 mm) for the 1966 Charger. It was also 650 lb (295 kg) lighter. It featured four-door sedan body design, while all the previous production Chargers had two doors.

Gen 1 LX, 2006 – 2010

The Dodge Charger LX is a rear-wheel drive four-door automobile introduced in February 2005. Built by Chrysler for its North American Dodge brand, the car was created to continue the Dodge Charger line, and replaced the Dodge Intrepid as Dodge’s full-size sedan. The Charger shares the LX platform with the Chrysler 300, the newer third-generation Dodge Challenger, and the discontinued Dodge Magnum.

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SXT and R/T models were also available as AWD (All Wheel Drive) starting in 2007. The All-Wheel Drive system is derived from the Mercedes-Benz 4MATIC technology. From 2007 to 2008, the AWD system is engaged all the time, routing approximately 60% of the power to the rear wheels and 40% of the power to the front wheels. The 2009 Charger AWD utilized the Torque-on-Demand system manufactured by Borg Warner which disconnects the front axles until extra traction is needed. This results in a slight boost in fuel economy while retaining the same maximum power split to the front wheels.

After three years of production, an update for 2009 models was made. This included moving the decklid’s “CHARGER” badge from the left to the right, making way for “DODGE” at the left. Tail lamps were also revised.

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Daytona

The 2006 Charger Daytona R/T debuted at the Chicago Auto Show. Featured with a 5-speed Automatic (Tiptronic) Transmission. It featured a high output 350 hp (261 kW) version of the 5.7 L (345 cu in) Hemi as well as an updated suspension and tires. Visual additions included a special front fascia with a chin spoiler and a black rear spoiler. In a retro touch, the Daytona R/T featured black “Hemi” decals on the hood and rear fender and retro high impact colors.

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In 2007, larger 20-inch chrome-clad wheels were introduced. In 2008, a revised stripe package was adopted. In 2009, horsepower was increased to 372 hp (277 kW) by the addition of Variable Camshaft Timing.

SRT-8

Street & Racing Technology (commonly called SRT) is a high-performance automobile group within Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. SRT began as “Team Viper” to develop the Dodge Viper. It later merged with “Team Prowler”, the developers of the Plymouth Prowler, to become Specialty Vehicle Engineering (SVE). This was renamed Performance Vehicle Operations (PVO). Since all PVO vehicles used the SRT name, it was decided in 2004 to use that name for the development group as well. SRT heavily tunes and produces vehicles for the Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep brands.

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An SRT-8 version of the Charger debuted at the 2005 New York International Auto Show. Powered by a 425 hp (317 kW) version of the 6.1 L (370 cu in) Hemi, it also featured upgraded Brembo brakes, and interior and exterior updates. The engine produces 420 lb·ft (569 N·m) of torque. The 425 net horsepower of the modern 6.1 L Hemi makes it even more powerful than the legendary Chrysler Hemi engines of the muscle car era, the biggest of which was rated at 425 gross horsepower. This makes the 6.1 L Hemi engine the most powerful V8 engine that Chrysler has ever put in a production vehicle with a 5-speed automatic transmission.

Super Bee

A new Super Bee version of the Charger debuted at the 2006 New York International Auto Show for the 2007 model year. It shared the SRT-8’s 425 hp (317 kW) 6.1 L (370 cu in) Hemi engine, but was available in a special “Detonator Yellow” paint with black decals. It is a limited edition with only 1,000 being produced. A B5 Blue version of the Super Bee was shown at the 2007 North American International Auto Show and went on sale in early 2008, also with a limited run of 1,000. A total of 425 Hemi Orange Super Bees were built in 2009.

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Engines

SE – 2006-2010: 2.7L, 190 hp, 190 lb-ft
SXT – 2006-2010 3.5 250 hp, 250 lb-ft
R/T – 2006-2008 5.7 340 hp, 390 lb-ft
R/T with Road & Track Performance Group – 2006-2008 5.7 350 hp, 390 lb-ft
R/T Daytona – 2006-2008 5.7 350 hp, 390 lb-ft
R/T – 2009-2010 5.7 368 hp, 395 lb-ft
R/T with Road & Track Performance Group – 2006-2008 5.7 372 hp, 395 lb-ft
SRT-8 – 2006-2010 6.1L 425 hp, 420 lb-ft

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