It's definitely not an SS model but one can't deny this a sharp looking piece from Johnny Lightning. From the year it made its debut, I doubt is a insignificant car to muscle car fans.

The 1970 Chevrolet Monte Carlo, an all-new "personal-luxury" coupe, was billed as "a fine car at a Chevrolet price." Stylish and luxurious, the Monte rode a modified 116-inch Chevelle sedan platform but showed little kinship with mid-size Chevrolets — except at the front, which used two headlights instead of the Chevelle's four — and was intended as a rival to Ford's Thunderbird.

Long-hood/short-deck styling was sleek and well proportioned despite the car's ample 205-inch length. Monte Carlo's near-classic profile was enhanced by rear fender skirts, and its six-foot hood was the longest ever installed on a Chevrolet.

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Plush interiors held an instrument panel with round gauges and simulated burled elm. Drivers faced more than 25 "skillfully grouped" lights, switches, and buttons.

Monte Carlos were offered only with V-8 power: a 250-horsepower 350-cubic-inch engine was standard, with the option of a 300-horsepower 350, a 265-horsepower Turbo-Fire 400 or, for just $111, a 330-horsepower 400.

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Every 1970 Chevrolet Monte Carlo had power front disc brakes, concealed wipers, low-profile 15-inch tires, full wheel covers, Astro Ventilation, and an electric clock. Like most Chevrolets, they could be impressively personalized by scrutinizing the options list, perhaps starting with a vinyl top in five available colors.

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Performance buffs weren't forgotten in the rush toward luxury. The Monte Carlo SS came with a load of tempting gear, including a new, rather aggressive 360-horsepower 454-cubic-inch V-8 with dual exhaust system, automatic level control, G70 wide-oval tires on 15x7 wheels, and discreet identification.

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Furthermore, the potent 450-horsepower LS-6 version of the 454 was optional, making an SS — as the brochure stated — "a very deceptive car."

"Solid gentlemanly comfort without bombast," one ad promised Monte Carlo buyers. The sales brochure called it "a car without pretense" that "pampers you without overdoing it."

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Starting at $3,123, it was quite a handsome and tempting machine. In its opening season, Monte Carlos outsold Thunderbirds by a mile. Of 130,657 Montes built, 3823 had the SS 454 package.

Source: How Stuff Works

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A pity that the hood doesn't open all the way.

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