Big things with little cars
Big things with little cars
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Review: Once more unto the Orange Breach

The Jagermeister bender doth continue. After a brief dalliance with a Rally BMW, we return to my traditional stock in trade, the racing Porsche 911. This time we're taking the 911 further and further away from its traditional shape and beginning to morph into weirdness.

That weirdness comes courtesy of Erwin Kremer and his magnificently manic 935K4. The 911 silhouette of old is all but a memory, clearly visible only in the front half of the roofline and in the flat six orientation of the engine. Said engine in this case was augmented by two fire-breathing turbochargers and used to great effect by "Brilliant" Bob Wollek in the 1981 running of the Norisring Trophy, which he won in a Jaegermeister-liveried 935K4. So we come to today's review, the Truescale Miniatures 1/18 replica of Wollek's winning 935, modelled in resin.

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Illustration for article titled Review: Once more unto the Orange Breach

Design and Accuracy: 10/10

There's no two ways about it boys and girls, this is perfect. Truescale Miniatures is still a relatively new player in this game, arriving on the scene in 2006, but the bloody well came in with a bang. Every little decal is perfect, all of the details which make a 935 a special car are present and correct. This is on par with the best of the best.

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Illustration for article titled Review: Once more unto the Orange Breach

Fit and Finish: 10/10

If razor sharp details, panel lines and fit are your thing, then resin wins, hands down, every time. Not unlike the Spark 911 rally car I reviewed a few weeks ago, this really takes finish to hitherto unimaginable levels. As I've mentioned before, resin is the way forward for display-quality stuff, sure you have to give up some detail behind those panels, but what's on display is proper "tiny real car" brilliance.

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Features: 6/10

For all of its detail brilliance, there's one thing that 1/18 scale resin models can't do, and that's get you heart pumping if you like opening things up. Opening panel count on the 935 is a big fat zero. Suspension? Don't be silly. Steerable front wheels? Nope. Turning wheels? Yeah.... No. What are we left from a features perspective? Well the detail on the body is utterly insane. You see that corrugated pipe to cool Wollek's office? True to life. But the way I score these reviews is on a level playing field, no openings means low points.

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Value: 8/10

€190 to me at the time of purchase a couple of years ago. Cheap? Not really, but again, we're talking museum-quality detailing here. Resin castings are pricey things, but you get your money's worth when it comes to results.

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Rarity: 8/10

Not bad, only two are currently listed in the US on eBay, casting your net further afield gets you one in Hong Kong (Truescale Miniatures' native land) and one in the United Kingdom. We're not talking dime a dozen, but they aren't exactly needles in haystacks.

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Total: 42/50

A low-ish score for a premium product? Perhaps, however it's the feature count which drags down the overall score. To be perfectly honest with you, opening panels only hold my interest for the few minutes after I take a model out of its box, then it's more about what I can see behind the glass doors of my display cabinets, so if I were to only take that value into account this would have been an easy ten on the feature scale.

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Illustration for article titled Review: Once more unto the Orange Breach

With resin you've got to accept a tradeoff for the stratospherically high detail level, not being able to peer under a bonnet, look at an instrument panel from close up or see an oil line routing could be a sacrifice for some. For me it's no great hardship, especially considering what you get in return.

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