Introduced to the world at the Pebble Beach Concours in 2011, the L10-platform Lexus GS was the 4th generation of the company’s mid-sizer intended to compete with BMW’s 5-series and Mercedes’ E-class in the sport/luxury sedan segment. However, it wasn’t until the release of the GS-F model in 2016, that the GS fully competed with its competitors full lineup. That is when Toyota dropped its monster 5.0 liter 467-hp V8 into the engine bay of the GS. Did I say fully compete? Well, not quite since it’s German and American competition, save for Audi’s 450hp S6, make at least 100 horses more than the GS. For what it’s worth, the GS’s motor is naturally aspirated compared to the forced induction of the others, and, along with Cadillac’s CTS-V, it’s power goes to the rear wheels only as the motoring gods intended.

The model before you comes from Kyosho’s Samurai series, which is devoted to resin models of Japanese cars. Kyosho also has a line of resins that are produced by Ottomobile, but IDK if they are behind this project. Overall quality is better than Otto, as it should be since the Samurai line is significantly more expensive. That doesn’t mean the model is great by any means. While the blue paint is mostly applied flawlessly (it looks chipped off over the right rear door), the silver window trim is just brushed on, and as I unfortunately found, it is easily scratched. As seems to be the norm for models these days, the infamous Lexus spindle grill is sealed, as are all other vent openings on the car. Another norm, at least for resins, is the thin sheet plastic used for windows. This is the main gripe I have with my resin models, as the flat sheet does not curve to match the tumble-home of the cabin, and on 4-doors such as the Lexus, the frame for the rear door quarter glass is merely suggested by a painted on strip. There’s not much to say about the interior as it is difficult to see, but it seems ok except for the decal that is used to represent the center dash vents and clock. But I guess you don’t buy resins for their interiors. As a static display model, it looks great, but it’s price ensures it’s mainly for fans of the Lexus brand.

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