A Camry? You bought a freaking Camry? The car for which the word beige was invented? YES! Call me goofy (don’t worry, Mrs. Coupe does it all the time), but I will buy models of cars I would never actually want to own or drive. In the real world, I lust after exotic sports cars and big bruiser executive saloons just as much as the next enthusiast. But in the model world, those cars are a dime a dozen, with a visit to any diecast site revealing multiple Ferrari, Lambo, BMW, or AMG posts. But the regular cars we see on the road everyday and probably have in our garage? Those are the true exotics.

So it’s mainly for that reason that, while I have no desire to own a Camry, I bought the model almost as soon as I was aware that it existed. The model is of the new 8th generation XV70 Camry and is built on Toyota’s New Global Architecture platform. I know that not because Wikipedia told me, but because it says so on the box. What it does not say on the box is who made the model, but that is par for the course with these Chinese dealer edition models. Now I said I have no desire to own a Camry but if I did, this is the spec I would want: Camry Sport in white pearl with the black roof and red interior.

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Priced at $70, the model sits toward the lower end of the mid range category. For that you get good quality fit and finish, 6 opening features, and what is a Chinese dealer edition without sliding seats? Panel gaps are good except for the hood, which looks like it could sit a mil or to further rearward. As is par for the course these days, the grilles are all sealed. Headlights and taillights have good molded-in detail, but the headlights could use a little paint to bring that detail out. The engine is… there. I’m no fan of sealed models, but modern day engine bays, and the effort most model makers put into them, almost make me wish they would just keep them shut and put those development and labor dollars (renminbi?) into other parts of the model. The interior is well detailed with molded buttons and some legible labels. One odd aspect to the interior is that the sunroof shade is a permanent part of the headliner. Usually models with a sunroof either get a working shade or no shade at all. All-in-all, it’s a nice model, and if you’re NOT looking for excitement in your collection, I highly recommend one.

Since the subject of light painting popped up the other day, I figured I’d throw in a few of my own attempts since I was taking pics anyway.  The pics were taken with a Nikon D3300 at 100 ISO, F22, and a 5 sec exposure. My light source is a Viltrox L132T, pictured at bottom.

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