You’re not going to convince me that a Liberty Walk Nissan GTR makes sense. Taking one of the fastest truly useable road cars in the world and turning it into a slammed and widened show-car just isn’t for me and what I enjoy about my cars. The 1/18 resin cast from GT Spirit; that’s clearly a different story.

This item sort of suits my diecast collection perfectly in it’s own weird way. The car is too crazy for typical use and belongs only in my imagination and in my display case, as opposed to sitting in my driveway and trying to get through the hail and sleet that reigns in Northern Europe at the moment. Imagine explaining that at the car show next weekend.

Lets the trumpets blow

Let us not mention that this car is wider than most parking spaces, and some roads, up here in the Nether-Lands.

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It sure does look demented. In a good way.

I wonder what parts he used....

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The art of Liberty Walk, or LB Performance as they are sometimes known, is in the package they provide. Much like with the RWB Porsche from my last post, this Japanese Tuner provides the body kit and extras which constitute the ‘Liberty Walk package’, an ever-present scene at most car shows nowadays.

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Menacing. But try taking a corner with your air-ride slammed like that.

Getting yourself the body panels and wing (this ‘drag’ version, or a massive LM style unit) will set you back between $13,700 and $15,500, while the Airrex suspension setup is going to run just shy of $8,000. And that’s it, that’s the LB package.

Pearlescent paint is almost a must with a car like this. or camo wrap.

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Most owners will have opted to also boost the 3.8l V6 engine upwards of it’s stock output of around 550hp, as well as fitting the almost-required Armytrix exhaust system. It sounds amazing at full-tilt, but also so very anti-social on a quiet Sunday drive past some windmills and sheep.

Wheels and tires are your choice, obviously, though Liberty Walk has their favourite manufacturers lined up should you need a recommendation.

The orange wheel bolts with the red callipers is killing me. Someone please call a stylist for this situation.

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Dish like a satellite

All-in all you’ll be out around $25,000 on top of the cost of your GTR, but you will also be moistening Nikon lenses all over the show-scene. So that’s something.

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I am not certain if you get a discount for running all the sponsorship stickers on your ride, or if the majority of real-world LB Performance owners just chose to complete the look with this added effect. Looks very show-car either way

Maybe one with more meaty tires and some static suspension would be fun on the highway.
Who’se behind me? It’s not payments, not with these sponsors!

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In real-life I enjoy driving my cars in every possible situation. My cars make it to the supermarket weekly and get covered in mud and grime daily. They quite frequently alternate between being cruising at the highway speed limit for hours on end and weaving their way into the center of an 800+ year old city. They need to be able to take my dogs somewhere, and make me smile on the way back. Always.

This car, much like the RWB Porsches and other batshit stuff I’ve shown you in the past, belongs in my imagination. If I had a Nissan GTR, and I would not have an R35 gen car, It would be built just crazy enough to still be able to use the thing whenever I wanted. Adding the weight and complexity of air-ride, and the width of the fragile body kit, would ruin the car for me, and relegate it to show-car status. I’d rather something more subtle.

I’d also build a different RWB, where I lucky enough to build a real one.

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Let’s not forget that this a Resin cast model of a car; not the real car. That means I adore the lunacy of it.

GT Spirit did their usual work on this car. The exterior really is a 9/10 job, with my only real complaint being the width of the space between the body of the original car and the flares. They are moulded as one piece here, I just wish the mould line was filled with some black to better mimic the 1:1 GTRs out there.

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Other exterior features, such as lights, wheels, vents and the aerokit are all stellar. This is one from GT Spirit’s cheaper model ranges, yet it only really shows when the eye comes dangerously close to those angular lines.

Can’t stop thinking about keeping those exhausts clean.

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The interior is typical for both GT Spirit as well as Nissan; Black and Techy. If you could open the doors on this model and peer inside unencumbered by blocked angles and shiny windows, you would be disappointed that the detail level and execution are closer to a 6/10 rating.

Imagine all the stitching being coloured orange

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PUSH ALL THE BUTTONS!!!

There Isn’t much to see in the interior of this car. The gauges and main screen features are replicated very, very well and the seats do look very Nissan-y, though had it featured something more from the RGB colour spectrum it may have been more interesting in there.

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However, if you want someone to make a model of this car with opening bits and detail to match the exterior, you’re going to lighten your wallet quite a bit more than in this instance. So, as with the RWB cars, aren’t these models destined for those people who like the lunacy of it all, but reserve the primo display spots and cash for the items they really and truly want to own in every possible way, 1:1 and otherwise?

Not the point. It’s a show-car in 1:18 as well as 1:1 form, and those are just for looking at and drooling over. They’re for displaying ceremoniously and for causing uproarious enthusiasm in the community. They’re for stimulating not only the passion for this hobby and others, but also the enthusiasm which led us al to the automotive world to begin with.

Have some heavily HDR modified photos to go along with this clearly strange thought which I’ve had.

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