Bonjour, et bienvenues au semaine des Simcas! Today we’ll have a model of the first big wagon ever made in Brazil, the Simca Jangada!

In the 1962 São Paulo’s Auto Show, Simca do Brasil presented their yearly lineup with the Chambord, the Rallye (stay tuned!!) and the brand new Jangada, a wagon derived of the Chambord and very close to the french Simca Marly, but with noticeable differences.

Sure, in ‘62 there were other wagons, namely the VW Kombi and the DKW Vemaguet, but none of them had luxury or could carry the passengers comfortably. The Simca Jangada had two bench seats, so 6 adults could travel in style and be pampered by its luxury bits and pieces.

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Not only those 6 adults, you could even put two small seats on the trunk, facing the rear window, to carry two extra kids! It’s the ultimate Sunday Funday car!

If you decided to carry dead weight instead of living passengers, no problem. By folding the seats the Jangada got a very respectful 1800 l of space on the back.

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Two years later, Simca introduced the Tufão (typhoon in Portuguese) option. It included engine modifications on the weak V8 to tweak it up to 112 hp, and a plane roof, instead of the curved with creases on the Chambords, as you can see on the model of the first episode of this series.

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The Tufão included also another carburettor, and a manual lever for the ignition timing. This may seem silly, but it was necessary, because our Brazilian gasoline was a complete garbage at the time, and there was a huge variation between the qualities between different gas stations.

The biggest change, though, came in 1966, the last year of production of the Jangada. Simca introduced the Emi-Sul (from Hemisfério Sul, or Southern Hemisphere), a HEMI V8 engine (yeaaaaaaaaah!!!) with a whopping 130hp. The Chambord could hit now 160 km/h (100 mph). Blazing fast for the 60's! The Jangada, however, being quite heftier, still struggled to get there, although its performance also increased.

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But, being a very pricy car, not many were sold, because very few people could afford one. Only 2705 were made, and today they’re as rare as rare can get. Occasionally one comes up for sale, and they easily cost six-figures.

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As a bit of trivia, despite being made in Brazil by Brazilian engineers who, unfortunately, know well our roads (a.k.a. the Moon surface, due to the amount of potholes), the Simcas were truly French cars: Some say they had to tie the doors with rope, so they wouldn’t accidentally open up on bad roads...

Simca Jangada: A Blast

The celebrities of São Paulo preffer the newest Brazilian car, superior to the similar French.

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C’est ça! I hope you liked and stay tuned for tomorrows episode!