Big things with little cars
Big things with little cars
Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante

While visiting the Museo Lamborghini two weeks ago I didn’t run into one of Ferruccio’s finest: The Flying Star II by Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera.

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Not that weird as there is only one in the world but still, I want to see it for real as I find it to be epic. Want to know how that 1:1 ‘60's shooting break looks? Here you go:

Source: www.classicdriver.com
Source: www.classicdriver.com
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And it proved to be Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera’s temporary swansong as after this one in 1966 it would take them up until 2006 to come up with a new design. Not sure if anyone will ever get a model of that car though.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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Touring took the chassis of a Lamborghini 400 GT (which they designed themselves as well) and made a pure 2-seater, whereas the 400 GT was a 2+2. Engine-wise nothing new, just a simple 3,929 cc V12. Stuck to a 5-speed Manuèl that actually was an own Lamborghini design after Ferruccio’s experience with the ZF they used in the 400 GT’s predecessor.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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And although the engine originally was designed by Giotto Bizzarrini as a racing engine in the early ‘60's, Ferruccio already detuned it a bit to have a more reliable and cheaper to build engine. It is quite the unit though:

Bizarinni on the left, Ferruccio centered. Source: www.autovina.com
Bizarinni on the left, Ferruccio centered. Source: www.autovina.com
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Responsible for the design of the body was Touring’s own Carlo Anderloni. He had been responsible for the 400 GT as well and you may know some of his other work: Aston Martin’s DB4 and DB5 were from a team led by Anderloni as well. The guy in fact could be called responsible for the success of Ferrari as he came up with the design for Ferrari’s first as well, the 166.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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The Flying Star II was a bit controversial as the usual GT’s were coupés, not a hatchback, or shooting break if you will. Of course it had Touring’s patented Superleggera production method: a system that consists of a structural framework of small-diameter steel tubes that conform to an automobile body’s shape and are covered by thin alloy body panels that strengthen the framework.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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In 1999 the 1:1 was offered for sale and it was restored by Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera themselves. I’m not sure if that was the moment it got the darker color than the silver this model has but that could be an explanation why it differs. The result of this restoration was shown at both the 2013 Rétromobile and the 2013 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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The model itself is a 1/43 White Box. I don’t have a lot of White Boxes, it’s one of two (the other one is French of course). It certainly isn’t perfect, the glasses of the headlights look a bit, well, cheap. That round clearly non-integrated tankcap (if that’s what it is supposed to be) on the model seems to be integrated on the restored one pictured before. Could be done during restoration, googling pictures sure give several places for it somehow. The wheels however are... Spot on!

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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As are the badges. The Touring one on the side could be better but still is recognizable as such.

It really could use those yellow lenses...
It really could use those yellow lenses...
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It’s name, Flying Star II, indicates there was a I as well. There was, but it wasn’t just one. It referred to Touring’s Flying Stars of the prewar period. Of course none of those were from Lamborghini. Those were build using Alfa and Lancia mechanics, amongst others.

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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Questo è tutto per oggi! I’m glad I went to the museum and one thing the museum’s shop made clear to me: There’s much more 1/43 for me to be getting...

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante
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Ciao Tutti!

Illustration for article titled Spaghetti Sunday: la Stella Volante

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