Teutonic Tuesday: Den Deutschen, grauen Camry

It’s a brand that doesn’t always get much love in the European car community: Opel. Not even here on LaLD as I rarely see them. For years their Kadett was one of Europe’s best selling compact car. And they had an image for being good, but certainly not great cars. If you wanted a truly good compact you would get yourself the more expensive and lesser equipped Volkswagen. Or move upwards.

But Opel at least had the guts to continue with big rear wheel drive platforms. They had the Rekord, Commodore, Monza and Senator in their line-up, the latter 3 with six-cylinders. In the ‘80’s these were no best-sellers however so they had to be replaced with one car to fit all. The second gen Opel Omega.

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That first generation actually replaced the Rekord and is known for it’s aerodynamic body (0,28 cw) and that epic car a small English company converted this one in: The Lotus Omega. But that’s for another Teutonic Tuesday as I yet haven’t found a decent 1/43 of this “Lotus” (nothing light about that one!).

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But somehow the Omega B (Opel always refers to their generation of models with letters in Alphabetic order) failed. Gone were the epic 6 in line engines, replaced by a X30XE V6 assembled in England. This was a V6 with an unusual V-angle of 54°. And the Omega B was a true world car as it’s known to you Americans as the Cadillac Catera and you Aussies as the Holden Commodore. I thought that the Holden Commodore used this platform as well in Australia but Small Scale Sydney told me this was a totally redesigned Omega A. However the glory of this poor man’s Benz was over: it was the last big rear wheel driven car for the marque.

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Up until now you’ve seen mostly shots from the front and side. If you wonder why this is: That’s the good part of this cast. This 1/43 is from Eagle Moss’ Opel Collection. It comes with a magazine and that collection actually is a nice mash-up of bread & butter and more special Opels. One thing they didn’t put much effort in though, is the back of this Omega B.

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This focussed you see the Opel Blitz on it’s back to make sure it’s an Opel. But somehow I don’t recognize the rearlights for one bit. There is no Omega B with orange blinkers. At first they were smoked, a grey color. And with their update in 1999 (the Omega B was in production from 1994 to 2004) they were converted to being white.

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And if you see it straight from behind, without any input from the side, it get’s even worse. I don’t know what cars one could confuse it with, those rearlights hint on a 1st gen Lexus SC somehow. To me that is because when I check those on Google these look quite different actually.

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So why do I refer it to as den Deutschen, grauen Camry? Because it had a dull, beige if you wish, image. And it’s for a reason it was the last big RWD Opel. They never stood out, that V6 wasn’t nearly as epic as the old in line 6 (great stories about that one, again: For another TT). Dead-cheap when bought second-hand. And totally not a bad drive.

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It’s successor nowadays is the FWD Insignia, which actually is the successor of the smaller Vectra as well. There have been RWD’s Opel’s after this one but these were the sport-orientated Speedsters. Which both were’nt real Opels anyway, just rebadged cars (okay, okay, the first one there was some development done for).

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Das war es wieder! Und ich erwarte vieles Brot und Butter PKWs heute! Ich wünsche Ihnen ein tolles Wochen. Tschüss!!!

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