I just had to have one of them fancy German-type titles too, tell you what. Long words they use...

1975 was an interesting year in Le Mans history, one of Porsche’s rare bye years at the top level, and with MATRA having quit, the door was open for the little guys to do big things. It meant cars like the lowly 911 could occupy 6 of the top 10 spots at the end, that lovely Ligier could bag 2nd with its amazing JS2 (a bit of a love affair for a couple of us here), and wily John Wyer, he of Gulf GT40 and 917 fame, could win overall again with a Ford-Cosworth DFV-powered Gulf-Mirage GR8, driven by Derek Bell and Jacky Ickx. Of the top 10 cars, the top three all had DFVs. Fourth was an old 908/3 run by Joest, and the following 6 were all 3.0L non-turbo 911s as that seen here.

This car, in what is to me one of the best liveries ever applied to a racing machine, finished 9th overall, piloted by Mexicans Juan Carlos Bolaños and Andres Contreras and American Billy Sprowls. It was fielded by Jägermeister Kremer racing, sponsored by Vaillant (the HVAC company). But, they share a name with the fantastic Michel Vaillant cartoon series by Jean & Philip Graton, so I figured that’d make a great backdrop. These Vaillant books are courtesy of Jobjoris, they’re slowly teaching me Dutch. The artwork is truly fantastic!

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Built for use in FIA Group 4 and using totally bitchin’ Bosch high-butterfly slide throttle injection (injection stacks! Noise!), the ‘74-5 RSR was good for over 330hp, and weighed only about a ton. Just a tick under, if my Google-fu is accurate. It featured those amazing fiberglass fender extensions to cover to new centerlock wheels, which saved both weight and time in the pits. This, to me, is one of the best iterations of the 911 ever built. No turbos to temper that flat-six scream, either. Hard to choose between this and the IROC RSRs. These were the first Porsche race cars my boss worked with, building the engines right in the back of our shop. A couple of these photos are taken on a program from a Trans-Am series race at Mosport in 1977, which features the car he worked on on the cover.

This model is in 1:43 by Universal Hobbies, my first by them. It’s not bad, but not great. I’d put it somewhere between an Altaya and IXO on the quality scale. Not very expensive though, and I wanted to try a UH model, so I’m not disappointed at all. It has good detail and paint with decent graphics, and good head and taillights, but some lines are off here and there (see the greenhouse in profile, and it’s almost like the wheelbase is a tick too short), and the color isn’t quite right as compared to the original car, this is too bright and blue, whereas the original was more turqouise. Not a bad model though, it looks great on display in its larger than standard case.

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Car Week was nuts! Such an amazing showing from everyone, I regret I couldn’t participate more. I thoroughly enjoyed everyone’s efforts! Looking forward to Engine Week, although as Jobjoris pointed out, that may be a bit tricky with 1:43s.