In the spirit of today’s 2.7RS madness, I present the Tomica Premium Carrera RS 2.7 Spark Carrera RS 2.7! This is a new 1/43 release from Spark’s more budget-conscious line, and the colors were so I good I had to try it. This shade is called Albert Blue, and while the orange trim was not a factory option, I think you’ll agree the combo is perfect. Citizen Patrick went to great lengths in quality control after he found a blemish on the first one he was going to ship, and it’s been worth the wait.

We all know the basic RS story by now: lightened panels, 210hp, 2200lbs (give or take), wide arches and that iconic ducktail (ah woo hoo!), all intended as a Group 4 homologation special. 1,580 were built, of which approximately 2,000 remain (as the joke goes...). Of course, they are now stratospherically valuable, perhaps being the one model that drives the 911 market more than all others.

The engines used technology developed from the 917 program, with the aluminum cylinders lined being Nikasil-lined, reducing friction and preventing the weakening of the cylinders. This was paramount, because for those of us who aren’t familiar with air-cooled Porsche engines, they use individual cylinders which fit closely together into the case on each bank, limiting the external dimension. So they couldn’t just make a bigger cylinder, they had to bore it out while retaining the outer dimensions, which means decreased mass and thus less ability to absorb and dissipate heat. This makes it all the more remarkable that the same basic design found its way to 3.8 liters in this car’s final descendant, the famed 993 RS 3.8.

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There were four optional versions of the RS: The base RSH (for Homologation), the lightest and most sparsely equipped, the M471 RS Sport which provided better seats and rudimentary interior trim, and the M472 RS Touring, equipped as would be a 911S. The Tourings made up the bulk of the run. Then, oh yes, there was option M491...

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Sweet, merciful Ferdinand. This, of course, was the fire-breathing, world-beating 2.8 RSR, a proper racing car. They made 55 of those, and in that great Porsche tradition, several 2.7 road cars would later be converted to RSR spec.

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On to the model. When Model Citizen started stocking this, I resisted for some time, but I hadn’t treated myself in a bit and was too curious about this new Spark line because I’m love with the others I’ve scored. I’m glad I went for it, it’s really very nice, with beautiful paint. There are a couple of “soft” body lines, and the outside mirror and wipers are a bit heavy handed, but those are rather small nits to pick as it looks wonderful in person. Not quite to the standard of the TSM ‘66 911 I featured before, but on display you’d be hard pressed to tell. Considering the significant cost difference I’m suitably impressed. Also, the display box is the best I’ve seen, I absolutely love the shipping crate. Full marks to Patrick for the world-class service, ensuring I recieved the best possible product. It’s nice to have a source as discerning as we are.

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As with the Panhard I teased on Friday, it’s a joy to shoot a car on which the paint is not covered with loads of decals and aero frippery. On to the rest of the photos:

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Back to the studio for debriefing and... cocktails.

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Have a great rest of your week, now I’m off to come up with a suitable Hump Day Haiku for tomorrow.

A doff of the proverbial to Peter Morgan for his excellent book, “Original Porsche 911" for detailed model info, and Bill Oursler for his also excellent “Porsche Racing Cars: A History of Factory Competition” for the background photos, both highly recommended for the Porschephile. Thanks also to the owner of our shop for leaving his sports Beetle in long-term residence in the back of the building.