So today I took TTB on a road trip just for him. Up until now I’ve just taken him with me on day to day stuff so today was a special treat for him. We headed off to a remote gold mining settlement that is fighting off becoming a ghost town. Along the way we stopped at various points of interest and snapped a few shots. So many shots I had to split this into two parts. Somewhere around 100 pictures give or take..

First stop was at Powelltown. It’s a timber town and really consists of a sawmill and a general store/post office/pub all in one and some houses. There used to be more going on here but the town really only survives because of the mill. Here TTB checks out a display of some relics of a bygone era.

This is how the logs used to be carted out from the forest before trucks were a thing. There was a series of ‘tramlines’ that snaked their way down the mountains. On the steepest areas a winch and pulley system was used to lower the trolleys. In other areas the logs relied on gravity to get down, these usually had a ‘driver’ or two to work the brakes! As you probably would have guessed it wasn’t a safe occupation and many lives were lost on run away log trolleys. The two trolleys displayed appear to have different brake set ups, not sure if was how it was done or if it’s just for this display to show the different types.

The trolley in the picture above has a lever system that pulls on the outer pieces of timber through the adjustable centre bolt. It works similar to modern disc brakes in that the timber is acting on the outer rim of the wheel and pressure is applied via the lever. It looks like a chain or rope was attached to the lever for the driver on top of the logs.

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The trolley at this end has a block between the wheels that is pulled upward via its lever.

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TTB inspects the brake shoe for wear.

One of the large pulleys used with the winch system mentioned earlier.

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I had to pull up and snap this shot. The chimney is all that remains of the house that once stood there. The fireplace probably caused the dwelling to burn down yet it still stands tall, irony?

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Next stop was at an old wooden trestle bridge. It was for a narrow gauge railway that is long gone. It’s one of many along the old route but most are on private property now and not accessible to the general public.

We parked next to one of TTB’s cousins.

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This was steeper than it looks in the picture.

Better shot of the sign below. The old railway line is gone but it’s still possible to make out it’s path through the bush. Many years ago (20+) it was possible to drive a car along here and I took that opportunity with a Baja bug I had at the time. A friend came with me and we drove for a few kilometres until a tree blocked the path. We then had to reverse for most of the way back. Fun times.

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I’m not usually a bridge guy but this is kind of sexy, for a bridge.

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I like tree ferns. Not sure why I just do.

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Oh and here’s ‘Mini’, our new dog. She’s two years old and is the reason for the road trip to Bendigo earlier this week. She had already vomited in the car by this stage, seems the twisting mountain roads didn’t agree with her. By the end of the day she seemed to have got her car legs and only vomited once more...

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Enough trestle bridge. Back in the UTE!! we went.

A house carved into a tree stump. Just a random bit of sculpture in the middle of nowhere. After traveling along this gravel road for about half an hour you find this just beside the road. I first saw it over 20 years ago but I’ve no idea how long it’s been there. It has been repainted at least one time that I know of. Some sad fool cut it off a few years ago. Luckily it was found nearby and replaced.

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It has some letters carved below the house, JJJC. Possibly the artists initials?

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Mini checks out TTB’s butt as dogs like to do.

Before we get into Woods Point we stopped at the cemetery. (Larger view of the sign below) The last time I was here it had a real spooky feel which sadly has been diminished recently. The entrance used to have two big old wrought iron gates on stone pillars with a matching fence either side. The gates opened to a path that was lined with huge pine trees. Some of the trees are still standing but it’s not the same now unfortunately. I suspect a pine tree fell and demolished the old fence and then the dodgey looking trees remaining were removed.

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The cemetery is still used today but has graves dating back to the 1860's. The rotunda is new.

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Love the rain water tank for flower water.

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I just wandered around in here for a while taking pictures, some with TTB and some without. The headstones should speak for themselves so I’ll have a moments silence and catch up with you later in town in part II.

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