Happy New Year! For my first post of the year, I present what was my most anticipated model of last year. No, it wasn’t some super pricey or rare model, nor was it some long-wanted grail. But it was long-wanted in a way. If you are a fan of Hyundai and Kia models, you are probably aware of Korean model maker Minikraft. Since about 2014, they have been making the Audi RS7 through their sub-brand Veritas. But their RS7 is $289. Now I like, maybe even love the RS7, but I don’t $300 love it. Every so often though, I would go to the Minikraft site, verify that their model was still $300, think about it, and still decide, Nah. But I got lucky early in 2018 when diecast retailer announced their own RS7. Priced at $199, it’s still not cheap, but was a relative bargain compared to the Veritas model. I placed my pre-order in August for a model with a supposed end-of-September release date. That date came and went and the model was finally released early December. So after many years of waiting, I finally got my RS7.

This is my first model from Keng Fai, though they are the company behind a few other model companies such as Schuco, Herpa and Shelby collectables. As much as I can tell, they also are behind the Minikraft RS7

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The paint is deep and lustrous, if a little thick. As is the norm these days, all the grilles are sealed, and my example suffers from some less than optimal masking. Panel gaps are generally small and consistent, save for the hood. Wheels and tires are well executed and the brake disks are actual metal with actual cross drilled holes and feature the scalloped edge that it seems only Audi uses. The headlights are among the best detailed units in my collection. They are the usual chromed plastic, but also have a separate clear plastic piece to represent the RS7's LED headlights, and that piece in turn has some sort of painted insert representing ??? I don’t know, but it looks good and I’m impressed by that attention to detail. The usual opening features are represented here with the bonus of an opening fuel door and sunroof. The latter is hinged at the front and not realistic in its operation, but at least it’s there. One odd thing worth mentioning; Keng Fai has molded Audi’s 4-ring logo into the hatch lid. But they also used a foil sticker on top of it. The sticker doesn’t have much to adhere to, and so it’s easy to pull off, as some of my pictures will show. Even more strange, the molded badge is chrome plated, so I don’t understand the need for the sticker.

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The cream colored interior is the highlight of the model. Whereas some makers will try to get away with modeling switches with a mere pad-print (looking at you Autoart), Keng Fai has seemingly molded and labeled every interior switch down to the headlight switch. Even the rings around the tach and speedo seem to be molded in. Sliding front seats and sunroof shade round out the interior features. Under the hood isn’t as nice. What’s there is decently detailed, but it is obviously a plate motor.

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Whenever a model crosses the $150 mark, it’s hard for me to justify for myself, let alone recommend to others, but if the RS7 is your jam, you won’t be disappointed.

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