Big things with little cars

Wagon Wedesday: BoS Buick Estate Wagon

I don’t think it’s a secret that I’m not a fan of resin models, but without them there would be plenty of cars that would never see the light of day in scale. One such car is this ‘74 Buick Estate Wagon from Best of Show. As a child of the midwest of the 70's and 80's, and as a certified car enthusiast, this big behemoth was a natural add despite it’s sealed tendencies.

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And when I say big, I mean BIG. While we enthusiasts bemoan the death of wagons at the hands of CUVs/SUVs, this thing was an SUV in every way except for ground clearance and 4WD. Built on GM’s C-body platform, the Estate Wagon (isn’t this just saying wagon wagon?) had a wheelbase of 127" and an overall length of 231". To put that in perspective, a current Chevy Suburban’s numbers are 130" and 224" respectively. Although the sedan versions of the C-body featured coil springs on the rear, the wagons used leaf springs.

In the words of Keith Sweat, “Something, Something. Something, Something just ain’t right.”
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This may explain why, to my eye at least, the left rear wheel of my model seems to sit a bit more rearward than it’s counterpart on the right. Beyond that little Q.C. foible, the model is nicely built. As typical of a resin model, the paint is smooth and practically orange peel free. The wood siding is a decal as you would expect, and the wood effect is about as convincing as that of the 1:1. Unfortunately, the rear side markers are part of the decal. My only other complaint has to do with the thin plastic sheet that all my resin models use for windows. I get that it’s cost effective to cut the windows from a flat sheet, the plastic doesn’t have the gentle arc it needs to look realistic. And they generally don’t seem to fit well either. The interior does its part in looking the part, which I guess is all it needs to do since it’s not accessible. As with other sealed cars in my collection, the floor is not carpeted.

A/C controls on the driver’s side where they belong. Away from the front seat passenger(s)
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I’ve read that BoS models are produced by Ottomobile, but they carry a premium over that of a typicall Otto, despite being no better made. So what you’re paying for is exclusivity. And BoS has some subjects that no one else has touched, especially if you like big American iron that’s not from the 50's and 60's. But if you share my predilection for “malaise-era” iron, then this is the car for you.

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